ABOUT US

Our Mission

Housed in two for­mer fac­to­ry build­ings dat­ing back to the 19th cen­tu­ry, our muse­um is not only the first muse­um of labour in Aus­tria, but has also gained inter­na­tion­al recog­ni­tion as an exhi­bi­tion and event cen­tre since its incep­tion. The muse­um, locat­ed in a his­toric con­ser­va­tion area called “Wehrgraben” (trench), emanates a feel­ing of a peri­od long gone while at the same time con­sis­tent­ly pre­sent­ing up-to-date top­ics to its vis­i­tors. Find out more about us and our his­to­ry here.

 

Our Building

The two fac­to­ry build­ings on the banks of the Steyr riv­er that house the muse­um have been list­ed as nation­al mon­u­ments and pre­served in their orig­i­nal archi­tec­tur­al form. They are an exam­ple of the indus­tri­al archi­tec­ture of the Grün­derzeit era in the late 19th cen­tu­ry and orig­i­nat­ed in Lud­wig Werndl’s knife fac­to­ry. The build­ings were incor­po­rat­ed into Josef Werndl’s arms fac­to­ry, which was among the most impor­tant arms man­u­fac­tur­ing sites in Europe at that time, as Object XI in 1881.

In Werndl’s fac­to­ry, breech­blocks and trig­ger guards for rifles were pro­duced, pro­vid­ing work for about 300 labour­ers in 1890. From 1913/14, Werndl’s pro­duc­tion was grad­u­al­ly moved to a new main fac­to­ry and the build­ing that today hous­es the muse­um was used for accu­mu­la­tor pro­duc­tion by the Steyr­er Werke, as the com­pa­ny was called from 1926. After 1945, the Hack Werke used the build­ing for their cut­lery production.

When Hack had to declare bank­rupt­cy, the build­ing ceased to be used for indus­tri­al pro­duc­tion. In 1985, the Muse­um Arbeitswelt bought it at an auc­tion and com­plete­ly refur­bished the facil­i­ties. The two parts of the build­ing were con­nect­ed through a glass roof, cre­at­ing the light-flood­ed cen­tre hall to which today’s muse­um owes its spe­cial ambiance.

The his­to­ry of the first Aus­tri­an muse­um of labour begins with the Upper Aus­tri­an region­al exhi­bi­tion titled “Labour/Man/Machine. The path to an indus­tri­alised soci­ety” in 1987. Inspired by the “Dig where you stand” move­ment, it was envis­aged as a muse­um of a dif­fer­ent kind.

Our Team

Financial
Management

Maria Vogeser-Kalt

Maria Vogeser-Kalt

Tele­fon: +43 7252 77351–13
Mail: maria.vogeser-kalt@nullmuseum-steyr.at

PR & Communication

Philip Templ

Philip Templ

Tele­fon: +43 7252 77351–14
Mail: philip.templ@nullmuseum-steyr.at

IN-HOUSE-TECHNICIAN

Andreas Liebl

Andreas Liebl

Tele­fon: +43 7252 77351–28
Mail: hd@nullmuseum-steyr.at

Cultural Management

Stephan Rosinger

Stephan Rosinger

Tele­fon: +43 7252 77351–15
Mail: stephan.rosinger@nullmuseum-steyr.at

Education & Science

Martin Hagmayr

Martin Hagmayr

Tele­fon: +43 7252 77351–19
Mail: martin.hagmayr@nullmuseum-steyr.at

IN-HOUSE-TECHNICIAN

Stefan Gruber

Stefan Gruber

Tele­fon: +43 7252 77351–28
Mail: hd@nullmuseum-steyr.at

Administration & Coordination

Claudia Wimmer

Claudia Wimmer

Tele­fon: +43 7252 77351–10
Mail: claudia.wimmer@nullmuseum-steyr.at

Education & Science

Felix Fröschl

Felix Fröschl

Tele­fon: +43 7252 77351–17
Mail: felix.froeschl@nullmuseum-steyr.at

IN-HOUSE-TECHNICIAN

Naeem Ajram

Naeem Ajram

Tele­fon: +43 7252 77351–28
Mail: hd@museum-steyr.at

Visitor
Service

Bettina Ebner

Bettina Ebner

Tele­fon: +43 7252 77351–18
Mail: bettina.ebner@nullmuseum-steyr.at

Education & Science

Verena Moos

Verena Moos

Tele­fon: +43 7252 77351–16
Mail: verena.moos@nullmuseum-steyr.at

Accounting

Martin Kaiser

Martin Kaiser

Visitor
Service

Sarah Hujber

Sarah Hujber

Tele­fon: +43 7252 77351–18
Mail: sarah.hujber@nullmuseum-steyr.at